Tayuya (Cayaponia tayuya) root powder Tayuya Powder

Cayaponia tayuya

This product is no longer sold by Raintree Nutrition, Inc. See the main product page for more information why. Try doing a google search or see the rainforest products page to find other companies selling rainforest herbal supplements or rainforest plants if you want to make this rainforest formula yourself.

Currently, tayuya is employed in North and South America for its pain-reducing properties and more.* Natural health practitioners in the United States are using tayuya to treat irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), dyspepsia and sluggish digestion, neuralgia, sciatica, gout, headaches, rheumatism, and as a metabolic regulator.* For more information about tayuya (Cayaponia tayuya), please refer to the Database File for Tayuya in the Tropical Plant Database. To see pictures of tayuya, click here.

Traditional Uses:* for pain of all types (arthritis, migraines and headaches, stomach aches, menstrual pain, etc.); for central nervous system disorders (sciatica, neuralgia, multiple sclerosis, epilepsy, nerve injuries, etc.); as a general detoxification aid and blood cleanser; for acne, eczema, dermatitis and other skin problems; for emotional fatigue and depression

Suggested Use: This plant is best prepared as an infusion (tea): Use one teaspoon of powder for each cup of water. Pour boiling water over herb in cup and allow to steep 10 minutes. Strain tea (or allow settled powder to remain in the bottom of cup) and drink warm. It is traditionally taken in 1 cup dosages, 2-3 times daily. For more complete instructions on preparing herbal infusions, see the Methods for Preparing Herbal Remedies Page.

Contraindications: None known.

Drug Interactions: None known.





Third-Party Published Research*

All available third-party published research on tayuya be found at PubMed. A partial listing of the third-party published research on tayuya is shown below:

Anti-inflammatory, Pain-Relieving & Anti-arthritic Actions:
Escandell, J. M., et al. "Inhibition of delayed-type hypersensitivity by Cucurbitacin R through the curbing of lymphocyte proliferation and cytokine expression by means of nuclear factor AT translocation to the nucleus." J Pharmacol Exp Ther. 2010 Feb;332(2):352-63.
Aquila, S., et al. "Anti-inflammatory activity of flavonoids from Cayaponia tayuya roots." J Ethnopharmacol. 2009 Jan 21;121(2):333-7.
Escandell, J., et al. "Dihydrocucurbitacin B inhibits delayed type hypersensitivity reactions by suppressing lymphocyte proliferation." J Pharmacol Exp Ther. 2007 Sep;322(3):1261-8.
Siqueira, J., et al. "Anti-inflammatory effects of a triterpenoid isolated from Wilbrandia ebracteata Cogn." Life Sci. 2007 Mar 20;80(15):1382-7.
Escandell, J. M., et al. "Cucurbitacin R reduces the inflammation and bone damage associated with adjuvant arthritis in Lewis rats by suppression of TNF-{alpha} in T lymphocytes and macrophages." J. Pharmacol. Exp. Ther. 2006 Feb; 532(1-2): 145-54.
Escandell, J. M., et al. “Dihydrocucurbitacin B, isolated from Cayaponia tayuya, reduces damage in adjuvant-induced arthritis.” Eur. J. Pharmacol. 2006 Feb; 532(1-2): 145-54.
Recio, M. C., et al. “Anti-inflammatory activity of two cucurbitacins isolated from Cayaponia tayuya roots.” Planta Med. 2004; 70(5): 414-20.
Himeno, E., et al. “Structures of cayaponosides A, B, C and D, glucosides of new nor-cucurbitacins in the roots of Cayaponia tayuya.” Chem. Pharm. Bull. (Tokyo) 1992; 40(10): 2885–87.
Ruppelt, B. M., et al. “Pharmacological screening of plants recommended by folk medicine as anti-snake venom—I. Analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities.” Mem. Inst. Oswaldo Cruz 1991; 86 (Suppl. 2): 203–5.
Rios, J. L., et al. “A study of the anti-inflammatory activity of Cayaponia tayuya root.” Fitoterapia 1990; 61(3): 275–78.
Faria, M. R. and E. P. Schenkel. “Caracterizacao de cucurbitacinas em especies vegetais cohecidas popularmente como taiuiá.” Ciencia e Cultura (São Paulo) 1987; 39: 970–73.
Bauer, R., et al. “Cucurbitacins and flavone C-glycosides from Cayaponia tayuya.” Phytochemisty. 1984: 1587–91.

Cytotoxic & Anticancerous Actions:
Lang, K., et al. "Synthesis and cytotoxic activity evaluation of dihydrocucurbitacin B and cucurbitacin B derivatives." Bioorg Med Chem. 2012 May 1;20(9):3016-30.
Escandell, J. M., et al. "Bcl-2 is a negative regulator of interleukin-1beta secretion in murine macrophages in pharmacological-induced apoptosis." Br J Pharmacol. 2010 Aug;160(7):1844-56.
Siqueira, J., et al. "Evaluation of the antitumoral effect of dihydrocucurbitacin-B in both in vitro and in vivo models." Cancer Chemother Pharmacol. 2009 Aug;64(3):529-38.
Escandell, J. M., et al. "Activated kRas protects colon cancer cells from cucurbitacin-induced apoptosis: the role of p53 and p21." Biochem Pharmacol. 2008 Jul 15;76(2):198-207.
Yang, L., et al. "23,24-Dihydrocucurbitacin B induces G2/M cell-cycle arrest and mitochondria-dependent apoptosis in human breast cancer cells (Bcap37)." Cancer Lett. 2007 Oct 28;256(2):267-78.
Dantas, I. N., et al. "Studies on the cytotoxicity of cucurbitacins isolated from Cayaponia racemosa (Cucurbitaceae)." Z. Naturforsch. 2006 Sep-Oct; 61(9-10): 643-6.
Shaw, S. J., et al. "A series of 23,24-dihydrodiscodermolide analogues with simplified lactone regions." Bioorg. Med. Chem. Lett. 2006 Apr; 16(7): 1961-4.
Wu, P. L., et al. "Cytotoxic and anti-HIV principles from the rhizomes of Begonia nantoensis." Chem. Pharm. Bull. 2004 Mar; 52(3): 345-9.
Anon., “Anti-tumor-promoter activity of natural substances and related compounds.” Annual Report 1995. National Cancer Center Research Institute, Tokyo, Japan, 1996.
Konoshima, T., et al. “Inhibitory effects of cucurbitane triterpenoids on Epstein-Barr virus activation and two-stage carcinogenesis of skin tumor.” Biol. Pharm. Bull. 1995; 18(2): 284–87.

Immunomodulatory Actions:
Escandell, J. M., et al. "Bcl-2 is a negative regulator of interleukin-1beta secretion in murine macrophages in pharmacological-induced apoptosis." Br J Pharmacol. 2010 Aug;160(7):1844-56.
Escandell, J. M., et al. "Inhibition of delayed-type hypersensitivity by Cucurbitacin R through the curbing of lymphocyte proliferation and cytokine expression by means of nuclear factor AT translocation to the nucleus." J Pharmacol Exp Ther. 2010 Feb;332(2):352-63.
Escandell, J. M., et al. "Dihydrocucurbitacin B inhibits delayed type hypersensitivity reactions by suppressing lymphocyte proliferation." J Pharmacol Exp Ther. 2007 Sep;322(3):1261-8.
Escandell, J. M., et al. "Cucurbitacin R reduces the inflammation and bone damage associated with adjuvant arthritis in Lewis rats by suppression of TNF-{alpha} in T lymphocytes and macrophages." J. Pharmacol. Exp. Ther. 2006 Feb; 532(1-2): 145-54.

Adrenal Tonic & Anti-Stress Actions:
Panossian, A., et al. “On the mechanism of action of plant adaptogens with particular reference to cucurbitacin R diglucoside.” Phytomedicine. 1999 Jul; 6(3): 147-55.
Panosian, A. G., et al. “Action of adaptogens: cucurbitacin R diglucoside as a stimulator of arachidonic acid metabolism in the rat adrenal gland.” Probl. Endokrinol. 1989 Mar-Apr; 35(2): 70-4.
Panosian, A. G., et al. “Effect of stress and the adaptogen cucurbitacin R diglycoside on arachidonic acid metabolism.” Probl. Endokrinol. 1989 Jan-Feb; 35(1): 58-61.
Panosian, A. G., et al. “Cucurbitacin R glycoside—a regulator of steroidogenesis and of the formation of prostaglandin E2—a specific modulator of the hypothalamus-hypophysis-adrenal cortex system.” Biull. Eksp. Biol. Med. 1987; 104(10): 456-7.
Dadaian, M. A., et al. “Prostaglandin E2 and F2 alpha and 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid levels in the blood of immobilized rats: effect of dihydrocucurbitacin D diglucoside.” Vopr. Med. Khim. 1985 Nov-Dec; 31(6): 98-100.

Cellular Protective & Antioxidant Actions:
Nayak, V., et al. “Protection of mouse bone marrow against radiation-induced chromosome damage and stem cell death by the ocimum flavonoids orientin and vicenin.” Radiat. Res. 2005; 163(2): 165-71.
Uma Devi, P., et al. “Protection against prenatal irradiation-induced genomic instability and its consequences in adult mice by Ocimum flavonoids, orientin and vicenin.” Int. J. Radiat. Biol. 2004; 80(9): 653-62.
Uma Devi, P., et al. “In vivo radioprotection by ocimum flavonoids: survival of mice.” Radiat. Res. 1999; 151(1): 74–8.
Vrinda, B., et al. “Radiation protection of human lymphocyte chromosomes in vitro by orientin and vicenin.” Mutat. Res. 2001; 498 (1–2): 39–46.
Huguet, A. I., et al. “Superoxide scavenging properties of flavonoids in a non-enzymic system.” Z. Natur. Forsch. 1990; 45(1–2): 19–24.

Antimicrobal & Antiparasitic Actions:
Truiti, M.C., et al. “Antiprotozoal and molluscicidal activities of five Brazilian plants.” Braz. J. Med. Biol. Res. 2005; 38(12): 1873-8
Chiappeta, A. D. A., et al. “Higher plants with biological activity—Plants of Pernambuco. I.” Rev. Inst. Antibiot. Univ. Fed. Pernambuco Recife 1983; 21(1/2): 43–50.



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not intended to treat, cure, mitigate or prevent any disease.
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Last updated 12-28-2012